Kyokushin-kan European Cup Tournament, Hungary 2007

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The Winners

Part One : Cooperation

The success of Kyokushin-kan's first European Cup Tournament can be best summarized with the words "unity" and "cooperation." The leaders of multiple Kyokushin organizations worked together to make the day's events successful.

Our new Kyokushin-kan Country Representative Sandor Brezovai (uchi deshi of Mas Oyama 17 years ago, and Country Representative of Matsui's IKO for 12 years) hosted two tournaments on the same day. The first was the "Hungarian Junior Olympics" for all Kyokushin Junior fighters (under 18 years old). This tournament was open to all Kyokushin organizations, and there were representatives from no less that eight organizations present. The second tournament, held in the evening, was the Kyokushin-kan European Cup, which included Kyokushin-kan adult fighters from 9 countries, including Hungary, Poland, Ukraine, Spain, and Belarus in addition to Russia, the United States and South Africa. This latter tournament was open to other organizations, but was primarily made up of Kyokushin-kan fighters. The same Kyokushin-kan Russian team that dominated the Kyokushin-kan World Tournament in Moscow in 2005 dominated this tournament as well, taking first place in all adult male divisions: light, middle, and heavy.

Kancho Royama is seen here with Kyokushin-kan Country Representative of Hungary, Sandor Brezovai.

There is a law in Hungary that forbids any Kyokushin tournament organizer from awarding a "Hungarian Champion" title unless the tournament is open to all Kyokushin organizations. Thus, it's only possible to have one Kyokushin Hungarian Champion and to win that title he has to compete against fighters from the other groups as well. It was likely this law that led to an environment unique in Europe, and in the world, in which the leaders of all Kyokushin groups are able to cooperate and work together to support the same tournaments. Kancho was impressed by this development and expressed the hope that Hungary will start to serve as a model for Kyokushin all around the world.

"Of course we welcome new members to Kyokushin-kan. But we are in no hurry. The organization that grows slowly and welcomes the best people is the one that will be the strongest in the end. In the meantime, it's unrealistic to think that we can stop or restrict the workings of other organizations. In accordance with Sosai's teachings, all of us in Kyokushin are one family. The first step is cooperation and getting to where different groups can work together, even if they maintain their independence. I have no doubt that Kyokushin-kan is the best representative of Sosai's Kyokushin karate. In the end this will lead to other members and leaders from other organizations gradually wanting to come in the direction of Kyokushin-kan. And of course some will not want to join us, and that's fine. We will continue to offer the hand of friendship to them as well." ~ Kancho Royama

In Hungary this week, we bore witness, time and time again, to the leaders of until-now competing Kyokushin organizations expressing their desire to cooperate and work together to sponsor tournaments in the future. "This is the first step," Kancho said, "to unifying all of Kyokushin as one as it was intended by Sosai."

The judges for the Hungarian Children's Olympics (Junior Karate Tournament), held during the day, represented many Kyokushin organizations including Matsui's IKO and groups led by Matsushima, Midori, and others.

Kancho is seen here having lunch with the Mayor and Vice Mayor of Szentes, the city where the tournament was held. At Kancho's left is Kyokushin-kan's new Country Representative in Hungary, Sandor Brezovai. Kancho was accompanyed to Hungary by Shihan's Kaneko and Ishijima (at Kancho's right).

Here Kancho and Kaneko Shihan from Japan conduct a judging seminar on the eveing prior to tournament to present the various rule changes that have occured during start of the Kyokushin-kan era.

The Opening Ceromony including all fighters for both tournaments, with Kancho at front and Branch Chief representatives from many Kyokushin Organizations present.

The confident Russian team enters the arean. These three were the champions of Kyokushin-kan's world tournament in Moscow in 2005.

The host country team.

On the day following the tourament Kancho hosted a seminar at Sensei Sandor Brezovai's dojo. Some participants came from other organizatins and Kancho spent the first hour discussing the chain of events from the time of Sosai's death that led to the creation of Kyokushin-kan.

Behind Kancho here are representatives from South Africa and America, as well as Sensei Brezovai.

We only had about 90 minutes for training, and Kancho concentrated on the basics.

Sensei Sandor Brezovai sitting here, behind Kancho, as Kancho answers questions for the crowd.

 

Part Two : The Fights

Seen here in the Junior Division, Sensei Brezovai's son, Botund, takes second place in his division.

Part Three : The Women's Divisions

 

Part Four : Demonstrations

Demonstrations were performed during the tournament by Shihan Kaneko (left) and Shihan Ishijima (right) from Japan who demonstrated bo kata and kumi-bo techniques . . .

. . . and by Sensei Brezovai of Hungary (right) and Sensei Ligo of USA (center) who demonstrated kata and tameshiwari.

Part Five : Kancho in Budapest

Kancho on the steps of the Hungarian Parliment Building with Branch Chiefs from Hungary, US, and Japan.

Kancho vieweing the crown jewels of Hungary beneath the 96 meter high gothic dome of the Hungarian Parliment Building.

Seen here with Kancho on a tour of the Hungarian parliment are instructors from Japan and fighters from America.

Part Six : The Winners

Women's Kumite, Under 55 kg (above)

Champion
HERCZEG LILLA
HUNGARY
Second Place
BUSHUEVA ALEXANDRA
RUSSIA
Third Place
SELIUKOVA NATALIA
BELARUS
Fourth Place
HORVÁTH ZSUZSANNA
HUNGARY

 

Women's Kumite, Under 65kg (above)

Champion
ÁBRAHÁM EDIT
HUNGARY
Second Place
BEDE ANNAMÁRIA
HUNGARY
Third Place
SZABÓ ANIKÓ
HUNGARY
Fourth Place
PUSKÁS NÓRA
HUNGARY

 

Men's Kumite, Under 70kg (above)

Champion
EMIL DZHAFAROV
RUSSIA
Second Place
YAKOVENKO YEVGEN
UKRAINE
Third Place
FILIP MOSZYNSKI
POLAND
Fourth Place
GYARMATI IMRE
HUNGARY

 

Men's Kumite, Under 80kg (above)

Champion
ABDURASHIDOV SHAMSUDIN
RUSSIA
Second Place
KNYSH MAKSYM
UKRAINE
Third Place
SZUCS GERGO
HUNGARY
Fourth Place
MAGNA GERG0
HUNGARY

 

Men's Kumite, Over 80kg (above)

Champion
SERGEJ OSIPOV
RUSSIA
Second Place
TYANDELA SIYADONGH
SOUTH AFRICA
Third Place
ZOLTAY SZABOLCS
HUNGARY
Fourth Place
LUCZAK PRZEMYSLAW
POLAND